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CEDAW Impact collection

how has CEDAW been used around the world?

This literature collection documents how CEDAW - the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women - has been used in different countries around the world. The emphasis is on documenting domestic use of the Convention, hence, you will find descriptions and assessments of government action (executive, legislative, and judiciary), non-governmental action, as well as resistance to the Convention if it influences or hinders action taken in response to CEDAW.

We are collecting material from both States parties and non-States parties to CEDAW. All states are alphabetically listed (see buttons above; note that all states are listed under their official names, hence some are listed in places where you might not expect them, such as "Tanzania" under "U" for "United Republic of Tanzania"). 

This collection does not focus on CEDAW in general and on its significance within international law, but many other sources cover this dimension, including my book "Translating international women's rights: The CEDAW Convention in context" (Palgrave Macmillan 2016), in the context of which this collection has been developed. Please also note that we do not list periodic reports of States parties or NGO shadow reports as they are conveniently compiled at the official website of the Committee (see "official site of the CEDAW Committee").

This collection is work in progress - thus far, we have material for the majority of states, but not for all, and most sources are in English. We would like to make this site as up-to-date, comprehensive, and inclusive as possible, so if you have information that you think belongs here, please get in touch (see feedback box below or email szwingel@fiu.edu).

It has been exciting to see an increase in the use of the Convention over time AND an increased interest to document and explain these dynamics. We see this site as another piece in the grand mosaic of transnational women's rights activism and research.

Explore and enjoy!

Susanne Zwingel (with support from several fantastic FIU students and library staff: thanks in particular to Mark Pacho and Marissa Ball)